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From Build One, Sell Twice

Build or be billed.

Jack Butcher (Founder of Visualize Value)

I recently returned to Twitter (follow me @sippinonchris).

I spent some time recalibrating my feed. I unfollowed the trash and followed accounts that I thought were worth my time. I stumbled upon one of the greatest gifts the internet has ever given me:

high-quality Twitter threads.

For those that aren’t familiar, you can create a thread on Twitter by replying to your own tweet and it provides a particular reading experience, but also makes the character limit (almost) infinite.

I love this because it’s changed the quality of the type of information that can be shared on Twitter. I believe we need more bandwidth to communicate more complex ideas and Twitter threads do just that! Suddenly we’re no longer limited to the 280 characters.

Big thanks to @jackbutcher for sharing these ideas on Twitter and for having an account that spreads good and valuable information.

Here are some concepts from Jack’s fantastic online course, which I highly recommend.

I posted this because I needed to revisit these ideas for myself and I hope you find some value out of it too.

10 Concepts from Build Once, Sell Twice

1/ Build once, sell twice.

Move from selling your time to storing your effort in digital assets that you can sell twice.

This is something I’ve recently been taking seriously. I’ve been spending a lot of time turning what I do and know into digital assets. For some people this is effortless, for me, it’s heavy lifting. This blog is just one piece in a much larger puzzle I’m putting together. I’m hoping these posts can lay the foundation for online courses and other digital assets in the future.

I’m also trying to do this with my music. Since discovering this idea, I focused my music-making energy on creating digital assets. I’ve been slowly building my portfolio. As time goes on, my collection of digital music grows and grows and it’s there to sell to any artists looking for a music producer.

2/ Focus

The more frequently you interrupt the compound curve, the longer time-freedom will elude you.

This is something I have to learn over and over again, but it’s true.

Interrupting a compound curve stops growth.

I saw this clearly with my YouTube channel. When I uploaded consistently, each beat I made pushed me forward a little more in the space. But when I stopped and picked it up again, I didn’t see nearly as much attention. It’s simply because I interrupted the compounding curve. If I stayed with it, my channel would definitely have a lot more subscribers and engagement. I’m working on building the momentum back up, but I have to accept that the results I’m used to aren’t coming and I have to start slow.

This is true with anything. The more we interrupt the focus, the harder it is for us to do the deeper and more difficult work. It’s often the deep and difficult work that makes the difference.

3/ Iterate

Get going, then get good.

This is key to getting anything done. As I get older, the power in letting time be an ally becomes more and more attractive.

Aiming for doing something perfectly right out of the gate is the perfect plan for disappointment. More often than not, perfection creates no action. When it comes to making something of high quality, it’s all about getting it started and improving over time.

I’m sure the first time you had Coca-cola wasn’t the first version of the soda. Everything great started out bad and got better over time.

I experimented with this theory with my YouTube channel. I just focused on getting a beat out every single week and over time everything about my beat-making process got better. From the mixing to the mastering, to the arranging, to the rhythms. I got much further putting out “bad” music than I ever did when I “only released songs when they were perfect.”

4/ Productize

Move from selling time to building systems that generate results repeatedly.

This is hard, but I’m sure it will become easier the longer I hold it as a goal.

Initially, building systems takes time and care, but if the system is built correctly then the results will speak for themselves. When I’m not selling my time for money, I’m spending my time building systems.

5/ Solve problems

Identify a need and develop a treatment

This should is one of the first steps of doing anything valuable.

6/ Get your reps in

Building anything valuable and defensible takes time, effort and energy.

I’m not sure why, but sometimes I have an aversion to this. Sometimes I’m able to convince myself that reps aren’t necessary, especially when they feel unnecessary. But in anything substantial, we have to accept the process, show up and get the reps in.

Time, effort, and energy all are subcomponents of sacrifice. Sacrifice and commitment are the same things. If we’re committed to something, then we are willing to sacrifice for it. This means dedicating time, effort, and energy to it today, in the present.

7/ Use tools for leverage

Build an ecosystem for attracting and retaining customers.

Don’t reinvent the wheel. It’s better to stand on the shoulders of the giants who’ve come before us so we can see even further than they could.

That being said, there are so many tools for us to use that we’re made specifically to make things easier for people blazing the same trail later. Entrepreneurship is a great example of that. 50 years ago, even 10 years ago, starting a business seemed like a dangerous and risky venture, but now it’s almost the norm. A huge part of that is because of the technology!

When you encounter a problem, chances are there something already made that can help you through it. If not, then you have a new business idea! (See Concept 5)

8/ Practice content leverage

Use media to stop doing things twice that can be done once.

I tried to experiment with this idea when I was making Whip it Up Wednesday, videos of me showing the behind-the-scenes of beat making. The idea was that I would have an episode of WIUW filmed and I could chop it up to make as content later. I didn’t execute, but I’m definitely going to use that method for something in the future. This is how content creators create weeks, or even months, of content in a day or two.

9/ Build value ladders

Expand into every segment of your market.

Ah, this is something I’ve discovered with trying to monetize beat making. When I started selling beats to artists, I realized that I could go further and sell samples or drum kits to music producers too! The market has levels to it and there’s nothing stopping from putting our hand at each level.

After starting Sioné, I’m starting to see the real value is in distribution, not product creation. The value ladder is seemingly endless, and there’s nothing stopping us from getting our hands on each rung.

10/ Keep going

What feels futile early is foundational later.

This is so true. I know that every word that I typed in the rough draft of my book felt futile, but they have been my guiding light in actually writing the book.

It’s almost like the ultimate battle is with the idea of futility itself.

Ignore the thoughts in your head that try to stop you from laying a foundation. If it feels futile, chances are it’s foundational.